SkinFit

Healthy Skin From Within™

Limited time offer. US clients only.

We can provide an online physician to review and approve your SkinFit™ order.

GENETICS UNDER
THE SKIN

Skin is the largest organ in the human body. The skin not only acts as a barrier to protect the body from the sun’s ultraviolent radiation, toxic chemicals, and pathogens, but also helps to detect changes in the environment such as temperature and pressure.

Inevitably, constant exposure to environmental (extrinsic) factors and biological (intrinsic) factors contribute to skin aging, most noticeable on the face. Intrinsic aging is based on individual heredity and the natural effects of the passage of time. Individuals’ unique genetic makeup can also influence skin appearance and other skin conditions such as wrinkles, skin allergy and inflammation, skin elasticity, skin oxidation and glycation.

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What is SkinFit?

SkinFit™ is a unique, physician-ordered genetic test which analyzes over 70 genetic markers associated with seven categories of skin health. SkinFit™ reports on the individuals’ genetic predisposition to sun-induced skin aging and sensitivity, dry skin and wrinkle development, skin inflammation and allergy, skin texture and elasticity, skin’s protection against oxidation and glycation, and the skin’s nutritional needs. SkinFit™ was developed with input from major dermatology and aging science research groups located in Silicon Valley, Berkeley, New York, and San Diego.

How can SkinFit help guide personalized treatment options?

Based on the individuals’ unique genetics, the easy-to-read SkinFit™ report provides physicians with personalized skin care treatment choices to guide their patients’ use of skin care products and nutritional support as needed.

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CLINICAL IMPLEMENTATION FOR PATIENTS

SkinFit™ test provides personalized insights on the individual’s genetic predisposition affecting skin health. SkinFit™ empowers physicians with skin care treatment options and dietary micronutrient recommendations based on the patient’s genetic profile.

LEARN MORE ABOUT SKINFIT

Tanning Response

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: MC1R, EXOC2, IRF4, HERC2, TYR, SLC45A2, SLC24A5, ASIP region, NCOA6

Tanning is the production of melanin by the skin in response to ultraviolet radiation, resulting in darker pigmentation. Tanning response varies among individuals, and can have both positive and negative effects on skin health. Multiple genetic factors can affect tanning response.

Sun Spots (Lentigines)

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: IRF4, MC1R

Sun spots, or solar lentigines, are pigmented spots that range from millimeters to centimeters in diameter and can appear light yellow to brown in color. Sun spots are a sign of skin damage and aging, and their appearance can be influenced by genetics.

Freckles (Ephelides)

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: IRF4, MC1R, intergenic EXOC2 and IRF4, NCOA6, ASIP Region, TYR

Freckles, also known as ephiledes, are benign hyperpigmented spots with distinct borders appearing most often on the face, neck, chest and arms. Freckles are a result of increased production of pigment called melanin in the skin. Genetic factors can affect the development of freckles.

Wrinkles and Collagen Degradation

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: STXBP5L, MMP1

Wrinkles can range in severity from fine lines to deep furrows in the skin. Wrinkling is a sign of skin aging and is caused by both intrinsic factors such as genetics, hormonal state and skin pigment; and external factors such as the passage of time, gravity, chronic ultraviolet exposure and smoking.

Cellulite

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: ACE, HIF1A

Cellulite, also known as orange peel skin, refers to the bumpy appearance of skin due to uneven fibrous tissue and fat build-up (subcutaneous fat) underneath the skin. Genetic predisposition, hormone changes, gender, ethnicity, age and weight changes contribute to the risk of developing cellulite.

Stretch Marks (Striae Distensae)

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: ELN, SRPX, HMCN1, TMEM18

Stretch marks, also known as striae distensae, appear initially as red or purple lines on the skin and later as white or silver lines. Both mechanical stretching of the skin such as weight loss-regain, obesity, hormonal changes and pregnancy, and genetic factors can affect the development of stretch marks.

Varicose Veins

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: MTHFR

Varicose veins are dark purple or blue veins under the skin on the leg that often appear twisted and bulged like cords. Obesity, age, standing and walking upright for long times, hormonal changes and genetic factors are associated with the risk of developing varicose veins.

Dry Skin (Xerosis and Ichthyosis)

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: FLG

Dry skin, or xerosis, is a condition of rough, itchy (occasionally painful) skin with fine scaling, and small cracks that occurs at all ages. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of xerosis.

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: FLG

Eczema, or atopic dermatitis (AD), is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by persistent red-rash lesions and acute itching. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of AD.

Contact Dermatitis

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: FLG

Contact dermatitis (CD), or occupational dermatitis, is the most common work-related skin disease. There are two main types of CD: allergic (ACD) and irritant (ICD). Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of CD.

Generalized Psoriasis

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: HLA-C, IL12B, IL23R, TNIP1, IL13, TNFAIP3, MTHFR

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory genetic disorder primarily affecting the skin and joints. Psoriasis appears as raised red skin with white scales underneath. Genetic predisposition is the underlying cause of psoriasis.

Rosacea

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: intergenic HLA-DRA and BTNL2, intergenic PRELID2 and KCTD16

Rosacea is a long-lasting skin disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation, redness and acne-like skin eruptions on the cheeks, nose, chin, forehead, or eyelids. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of rosacea.

Antioxidation Response

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: SOD2, GPX1, CAT, NQO1

Antioxidation response is our body’s natural ability to detoxify and counteract harmful agents like ultraviolent (UV) rays, environmental pollutants, and toxins directly produced by the body. Oxidative stress occurs when our antioxidation response is weakened and is a major factor in skin aging. Genetics plays role in skin aging induced by oxidative stress.

Skin Glycation

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: GLO1, AGER

Glycation occurs in the skin cells as sugar molecules are chemically linked to collagen and elastin. These glycation products are referred to as Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) and they can cause skin damages, skin aging and inflammation. Genetic factors can influence AGE levels in the body.

Skin Nutritional Needs

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: BCO1

Deficiency in vitamin A is associated with various skin conditions including dry skin, abnormal thickening of the skin, atopic dermatitis and delayed wound healing.

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: MTHFR

Vitamin B2 deficiency can lead to skin conditions including angular cheilitis (inflammation of the corners of the mouth) and seborrheic dermatitis around the nose, eyes, and ears.

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: NBPF3

Deficiency in vitamin B6 (B6) or pyridoxine, is associated with various skin disorders such as pellagra-like dermatitis, stomatitis and seborrheic dermatosis. Vitamin B6 deficiency can also lead to vitamin B3 deficiency.

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: FUT2

Deficiency in B12 is associated with various skin conditions such as oral atrophy and skin hyperpigmentation.

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: SLC23A1

Deficiency in vitamin C leads to scurvy. Skin conditions associated with scurvy include abnormal thickening of the outer layer of skin, inflammation, delayed wound healing and dry, rough skin.

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: GC

Excessive exposure to UV promotes skin aging, while deficiency in vitamin D is associated with various skin conditions such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and ichthyosis.

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: Intergenic near APOA5

Deficiency in vitamin E may lead to skin damage such as ulcers, increased collagen breakdown and increased wrinkling.

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: MTHFR

Deficiency in folate can increase the risk of skin conditions including psoriasis, deep venous thrombosis, oral atrophy and skin aging.

Genes in which genetic markers are analyzed: FADS1

Deficiencies in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids can lead to various skin problems including dermatitis, scaling, dry skin, and psoriasis.

Step 1:

SkinFit™ can be ordered by an online physician designated by Pathway Genomics for you.
To purchase online with an online physician, please click here.

Step 2:

Once your SkinFit™ test has been ordered for you by a physician, you will provide a saliva sample using the collection kit found in the Pathway Genomics box.

Step 3:

You or your authorized health care professional will mail your saliva sample back to Pathway Genomics, along with your test requisition and consent form (return shipping provided). You can view our saliva collections instructional video here.

Step 4:

Pathway Genomics processes and analyzes the submitted sample in its CLIA certified and CAP accredited laboratory. Typically within two to three weeks, the patient’s personalized results will be available to the ordering physician. The results will then be released to the patient. Pathway Genomics has a team of genetic counselors available to ensure that both the patient and the physician understand the information in the report, and to answer additional questions. To contact a Pathway Genomics genetic counselor, please call client services department at 877-505-7374 or email clientservices@pathway.com.

All individuals who are interested in learning how their genetics may affect their skin health, and for those who want to enhance their skin appearance and minimize the risks of developing various skin conditions.

Note: SkinFit™ is available by a health care professional's order only.


REQUEST SKINFIT™ REPORT

skinfit 2-3 week turnaround time

HOW IT WORKS

This saliva based test is supported by scientifically validated genetic testing technologies, using clinically relevant markers and assays. In just 2-3 weeks, the SkinFit™ report will be delivered.

REPORT – PERSONALIZED SKIN HEALTH

✓  Results that are easy to read and understand.

✓  Personalized skin care guidelines included.

✓  Actionable treatment options.

✓  Reports available online.